Monday, February 26, 2007

The Statues of Queen's Park: Edward VII

With this post, I surpass the total number of posts on Le Voir Dit. The Transcontinental presses on, full steam ahead. As Chris Miller commented in my initial, this must be the right place.

Evoking Mr. Miller however, is merely a segway to the first of a series of posts (Yes, I like series, they keep me grounded. The question is whether or not I finish any of them!) on statues of Queen's Park here in Toronto. I know nothing about sculpture, but I hope to learn more via the reactions of my readers.

So without further ado...




















I probably could have edited the above, but what's a photo essay without a bit of bad photography?















Here's the statue itself. The low number of photos are mainly due to the fact that my batteries died after snapping the final shot.















There's a lightness to this work, isn't there? I especially like the horse in the show below.




















Really, this sculpture is about the horse, and not the rider, isn't it? Well, we'll have to wait for the ice to melt for me to get close enough to the Edward VII.

My favourite view:

8 comments:

chris miller said...

Thanks, Otto -- give me your address, and I'll mail you a spare battery so you'll run out again when shooting sculpture !

I couldn't find the name of the sculptor - that's so annoying ! -- it's as if the sculptor were just another tradesman.

And I agree that this one does feel light -- which is a good thing.

The more pictures -- the better -- and a little more sunlight wouldn't hurt either. (I'm sure you're getting your share of gray, dreary winter days)

Otto van Karajanstein said...

I'm glad this one got you over here!

I will try to find out who the sculptor is, and any other interesting information.

You haven't seen the last of this monarch!

Gawain said...

Hey, I have to dig up a photo of an equestrian statue myself. this is fun

Anonymous said...

I believe the sculptor was Sir Bertram Mackennal,RA, an Australian born sculptor who principally worked in Britain and was a friend of King George V, the sucessor to Edward VII. Mackennal obtained commissions for monuments following the death of King Edward VII. An equestrian statue was commissioined for Melbourne in 1911 and unveiled 1920 at a cost of 6,000 pounds.(WW I requirement for foundry work had interrupted casting) Subsequently a version was made for India (1919) and in 1921 another for London. The Indian statue in New Delhi was put into storage following Indian independence. In 1968 a Torono businessman took it home and offered it to his city if it would pay for reinstillation. This was refused and so the statue sat on a grass mound in Queen's Park Toronto. (Latter details quoted from Colin Ward, "Fringe Benefits" New Statesman and Society 11Oct 1995 Vol 8 issue 378 p 30.)

Anonymous said...

I believe the sculptor was Sir Bertram Mackennal,RA, an Australian born sculptor who principally worked in Britain and was a friend of King George V, the sucessor to Edward VII. Mackennal obtained commissions for monuments following the death of King Edward VII. An equestrian statue was commissioined for Melbourne in 1911 and unveiled 1920 at a cost of 6,000 pounds.(WW I requirement for foundry work had interrupted casting) Subsequently a version was made for India (1919) and in 1921 another for London. The Indian statue in New Delhi was put into storage following Indian independence. In 1968 a Torono businessman took it home and offered it to his city if it would pay for reinstillation. This was refused and so the statue sat on a grass mound in Queen's Park Toronto. (Latter details quoted from Colin Ward, "Fringe Benefits" New Statesman and Society 11Oct 1995 Vol 8 issue 378 p 30.)

Otto van Karajanstein said...

Anon, thank you so much for this comment!

Chris, there you go! I'll see if I can dig anything more up as well.

Big D said...

That information is incorrect. The sculptor is Sir Thomas Brock,RASc London 1919 and the statue was produced by A B Burton Founder, Tames Ditton
If you want I can post pictures of the two markings.

Andrew W. said...

By all means! I actually took some photos of the markings some time ago, and have never bothered to post them.